Blog Hops and Other Memes

It’s Monday, What are You Reading?

“It’s Monday! What are you reading?” is a weekly event hosted by Sheila at Bookjourney to share with others what you’ve read the past week and planning to read next.

It’s Monday again, and I’m definitely not feeling it.  Had a lovely weekend, dinner with friends and lunch with my Dad, and lots of time reading and blogging. And now it’s back to work.

I finished three books last week: The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins, Magic Lost, Trouble Found by Lisa Shearin (review here), and Poison Study by Maria Snyder.  I loved The Moonstone, which started out slllooowww but by the last part I couldn’t put it down.  I found myself last week actually reading as I walked to my work building in the mornings, which is a sign that I’m really into a book (for the record, people who walk while texting or reading drive me a little crazy). I still think The Woman in White had better characters, and The Moonstone really needed a strong female character.  But the mystery was riveting and I loved the way it was written, with a number of different characters taking turns narrating the story.  I also enjoyed that you never quite know who to root for in this book (you almost root for the diamond more than most of the characters).

The other two books were fantasy novels, and of the two I probably liked Poison Study more because it felt more original – although I think Magic Lost was written better.  Poison Study had all the things I like in a novel: original storyline, well-developed heroine, good action/adventure.  It’s the story of a young woman, Yelena, who is condemned to die for killing a man who abused her.  On the eve of her execution, she’s offered a choice: become the Commander’s food taster or die.  Being the food taster is basically slavery and likely death, but of course she takes it anyway.  I’ll save the rest for my review.

In other news, I received two review requests I’m excited about.  One is called Bride of New France by Suzanne Desrochers, and it’s a glossy ARC (my first one!) from Norton about a woman who is sent to a women’s insane asylum in seventeenth-century Paris.  The other is The Baby Matrix, by Dr. Laura Carroll who has a great website about choosing not to have children.  The full title is The Baby Matrix: Why Freeing Our Minds From Outmoded Thinking About Parenthood & Reproduction will Create a Better World.  I don’t have to tell you much more than that.

I’m also reading Redshirts, by John Scalzi, which is hilarious from page one, a spoof of everything that is funny about the Star Trek shows.  Will it beat Galaxy Quest?  I expect it will – Scalzi knows what he’s talking about and a book is almost always better than a movie even though Galaxy Quest is one of my favorites.

So, happy reading everyone and good luck with your Monday.

17 thoughts on “It’s Monday, What are You Reading?

  1. I like all of Maria V. Snyder’s fantasies. I will have to look for that book by Shearin too. I got a chance to meet Scalzi and get Redshirts autographed but have not had a chance to read it yet. As an original Trekkie, I am looking forward to it. My Monday Report is here. Have a great week!

    • That’s so cool that you met Scalzi! It’s really funny so far. Next year I really want to go to ComicCon.

      Does the Poison series get better over time? I think first books in series are usually the weakest, although there are exceptions.

  2. I read The Moonstone a few years ago and really enjoyed it as well. I can’t remember his name, but my favorite character was the butler/servant. I haven’t read The Woman in White, but I really should.

    Here’s my Monday Post.

    • I love the way the butler gets all his advice from Robinson Crusoe (I also love books within books) — but I think I liked the inspector best. You should definitely try Woman in White.

  3. Sounds like a great week. I’m with Andi — obviously being overly cautious about Wilkie Collins.

    Baby Matrix sounds fascinating. I never had kids and have thought that the default choice in our society should be re-thought.

    I heard the Redshirts author interviewed over the weekend — sounds like a hoot!

    Joy’s Book Blog

    • You definitely might like The Baby Matrix. It’s amazing how much society (or the U.S. at least) makes us feel abnormal when we don’t have children, like it’s always the right choice to have children even if you don’t really want them. I’d love to hear what you think.

      • Hi there, Author of The Baby Matrix here. My last book – Families of Two- looked at why some people don’t have the desire to have children. You’ll see- this book actually delves into the opposite-the nature of people’s desire to Have children. For example, we commonly think the desire boils down to our biological wiring, but it’s much more than that. The book examines powerful social and cultural influences that drive the desire for the parenthood experience, and why we need to be very aware of these influences to make the most informed choices about parenthood. I look at why believe what we believe, and challenges some of the assumptions we have come to think are just “true” when they aren’t. So the book is for parents, to-be parents, on the fencers, and non-parents alike. Enjoy!

  4. I hadn’t yet heard of any of the books you’ve been reading, but The Moonstone sounds good! And I love the title of Redshirts – that’s long been a joke in our family when watching a movie – “uh-oh, that guy is a redshirt!”

    Thanks for stopping by my blog yesterday and taking the time to comment. Glad to hear you enjoyed Ready Player One also.

    Enjoy your books this week –

    Sue

    Book By Book

    Big Book Summer Challenge

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