Reading the Rest of the Year

It seems like I just made my fall TBR list, and here we are, mid-October with the year fading fast.  I began October thinking “maybe I’ll just read whatever I want for the rest of the year.”  Which is a nice idea, only I’ve requested too many ARCs and I’ve fallen behind on reviews.  When I sign up for ARCs, I feel they should be my priority (although maybe I should ban myself from NetGalley for the next few months).

Still, I’ve got ARCs I’m looking forward to, from Rebecca Burns’ new book of short stories, to a first novel by actress Krysten Ritter, to a last novel by Helen Dunmore.  Normally in October I’d be doing something Halloween-themed, like the R.I.P. event.  But I probably won’t get to that this month.

In November there are two events I really like: Nonfiction November and Sci Fi Month.  Nonfiction November is hosted by Sarah’s Bookshelves and a number of other blogs.  Sci Fi Month is hosted by Rinn Reads.

On my nonfiction reading list are these books:

  • Giant of the Senate by Al Franken
  • The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore
  • Born Survivors by Wendy Holden
  • We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome by Ty Tashiro
  • Love, Loss, and What We Ate by Padma Lakshmi

And on my science fiction reading list:

  • The Stone Sky by N.K. Jemisin
  • Too Like the Lightening by Ada Palmer
  • Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
  • Cibola Burn by James S.A. Corey (Book #4 of The Expanse series)
  • Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee
  • Planetfall by Emma Newman
  • Crosstalk by Connie Willis

Practically speaking, I won’t read more than 2 or 3 in each category, so please let me know what you recommend!

And December?  Well, December is always about wrap-up posts and end-of-year lists. I always like to reflect on what I read, what I did differently and what I’d like to do more of next year.  Maybe in December I’ll go back to some of those classics I didn’t have the attention span for.  I suppose I might get in some “fun” reading too.

I know how much most people like fall, but this time of year really bums me out because I hate winter.  I’d much rather be at the end of winter than the beginning of it!  But at least there’s pumpkin-flavored-everything and the leaves are pretty.  In November I’ll be visiting family in Phoenix, and then the husband and I start planning our annual Hanukkah/Christmas party.

What are your plans for the rest of the year?

9 Responses to “Reading the Rest of the Year”

    • curlygeek04

      I wouldn’t say any are obscure. Emma Newman is perhaps less well known. I’m not sure what you’d call obscure and forgotten. Sounds interesting though!

      Reply
  1. Lory @ Emerald City Book Review

    I can’t even do NetGalley any more! And I tried not to do ARCs at all, but now there are these nice publishers who OFFER me things, and it’s hard to pass some of them up. This is the busiest time of the publishing year so I am getting backlogged.

    Nonfiction November, yay! Plus I’m of course looking forward to Witch Week, and trying to read simultaneously for both events (currently White Trash and The Buried Giant, a rather odd combination). Can’t even think about December yet.

    Reply
  2. Sarah's Book Shelves

    Thrilled you’re joining in! I liked Padma’s memoir and also am intrigued by Awkward – what a great title!

    Reply
  3. Audrey Kalman

    I’ve fallen behind on my Goodreads target because I’ve taken time to read three novel drafts for people this year! I have one more to go before year’s end. In between I’d love to get around to George Saunders’s “Lincoln in the Bardo,” which just won the Man Booker prize.

    Reply
  4. JaneGS

    I’ve been “reading what I want” mostly this year, mostly steering clear of making too many reading commitments, and it’s been a blast. I’m into mysteries right now, planning non-fiction for Nov, and holiday reading for December…but even that is subject to change. Very liberating. I’m not a sci-fi fan so I can’t recommend anything, but Al Franken’s list is a must read for me…someday.

    Reply

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