Tag: immigration

Nonfiction November: Books about the U.S. Immigration System

This week’s Nonfiction November topic is hosted by Katie at Doing Dewey, and the subject is to talk about nonfiction books on a specific topic (“Be the Expert/Ask the Experts/Become the Expert”).  I’ve been reading a lot this year about immigration, because it’s such an important topic  to understand right now.  So here are some…

Review: A River of Stars by Vanessa Hua

I wanted to like this book but in the end was disappointed.  I was really interested in the story, which begins with a young woman traveling from China to the United States to have a baby. Scarlett is going to a home in the U.S. for pregnant Chinese women, so they can give birth in…

Review: What We Were Promised by Lucy Tan

I really enjoyed Lucy Tan’s debut novel about a family living in modern-day Shanghai.  Wei, Lina and their teenage daughter Karen are a wealthy family  living in a luxurious “serviced” apartment, that have recently moved from America to Shanghai. The story is told from their perspective, as well as that of their cleaner, Sunny.  Through Sunny’s…

Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

I loved this thoughtful book about immigration and U.S. citizenship.  It was the perfect complement to the other books I’ve read on this subject, like Lisa Ko’s The Leavers and Diane Guerrero’s In the Country I Love. This is the story of Jende Jonga and his wife Neni.  The Jongas are from Cameroon, having emigrated…

The Leavers by Lisa Ko

This is a really thoughtful, moving novel about a Chinese family that is torn apart in the United States.  Peilan grows up in China in a small village but dreams of exploring the world, so she travels to New York for factory work at better wages.  She has Deming while still very young herself, and…

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero

With the current news about deportations and ICE arrests, it felt important to me to read a book from the perspective of someone who has experienced it firsthand.  Guerrero is not an immigrant herself, but her parents and older brother were born in Columbia.  Guerrero’s parents were deported when she was only fourteen years old,…

Review of The Tortilla Curtain by T. Coraghessan Boyle

The Tortilla Curtain might not be my favorite T.C. Boyle, but like his others it poses interesting issues, great writing that blends emotion and sarcasm, and even though it was written in 1995 every issue it raises is meaningful today. Curtain takes place in Los Angeles’ Topanga Canyon.  It’s a story of contrasts, between an…

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