Tag: immigration

Review: Go, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck

I read this for my book club, and it was a difficult read but it turned out to be a fascinating one.  I probably wouldn’t have finished it if not for the book club, but this was one of those rare books where it…

Nonfiction November: Books about the U.S. Immigration System

This week’s Nonfiction November topic is hosted by Katie at Doing Dewey, and the subject is to talk about nonfiction books on a specific topic (“Be the Expert/Ask the Experts/Become the Expert”).  I’ve been reading a lot this year about immigration, because it’s such…

Review: A River of Stars by Vanessa Hua

I wanted to like this book but in the end was disappointed.  I was really interested in the story, which begins with a young woman traveling from China to the United States to have a baby. Scarlett is going to a home in the…

Review: What We Were Promised by Lucy Tan

I really enjoyed Lucy Tan’s debut novel about a family living in modern-day Shanghai.  Wei, Lina and their teenage daughter Karen are a wealthy family  living in a luxurious “serviced” apartment, that have recently moved from America to Shanghai. The story is told from their…

Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

I loved this thoughtful book about immigration and U.S. citizenship.  It was the perfect complement to the other books I’ve read on this subject, like Lisa Ko’s The Leavers and Diane Guerrero’s In the Country I Love. This is the story of Jende Jonga…

The Leavers by Lisa Ko

This is a really thoughtful, moving novel about a Chinese family that is torn apart in the United States.  Peilan grows up in China in a small village but dreams of exploring the world, so she travels to New York for factory work at…

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero

With the current news about deportations and ICE arrests, it felt important to me to read a book from the perspective of someone who has experienced it firsthand.  Guerrero is not an immigrant herself, but her parents and older brother were born in Columbia. …

Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat

I want to say I loved this book, but it was a little difficult for me to relate to, even though it’s well written and has important themes.  Still, maybe this isn’t the kind of book you love.  It’s more a book you read…

The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

The Lowland is another fantastic book by Jhumpa Lahiri. It begins in the 40s in Calcutta, India, telling the story of two young brothers born soon after World War II. Subhash is the elder, but he’s often overshadowed by his daring younger brother Udayan….

Astray by Emma Donoghue

I had a hard time getting into this book at first, but once I did I absolutely loved it. Astray is a collection of short stories that are all based in historical fact. Donoghue says in the afterword that she collects interesting facts and…

Review of The Tortilla Curtain by T. Coraghessan Boyle

The Tortilla Curtain might not be my favorite T.C. Boyle, but like his others it poses interesting issues, great writing that blends emotion and sarcasm, and even though it was written in 1995 every issue it raises is meaningful today. Curtain takes place in…

Bookshelf Fantasies

A Life Amidst Books

The Perspicacious Bookworm

Reading for the critical eye

NerdyWordyBirdy

Reviewing books, society, adulthood, and more.

Ayundabhuwana's Blog

Books. Movies. Travel.

The Chocolate Lady's Book Review Blog

For mostly adult, literary, historical, contemporary, biographical, and women's fiction.

It's A Reading Thing

Lets chat about all things bookish!

Things As They Are

Life, literature, music, food & nature. Put the kettle on ...

A Little Nerd Told Me

Book reviews by an unapologetic Trekkie obsessed with dogs and books

pjnkskies

Reader and Reviewer

Novels & Teacups

reading, reviewing, tea drinking

Chasing the Four Winds

Reading, Writing, Nerding, and Honoring the Oxford Comma Since 1987.